Question: [inaudible] calling for uniformed police officers not to participate in the St. Patrick’s Day Parade?

Mayor: I believe that uniformed city workers have a right to participate if they choose to, and I respect that right. Yes?

[skip]

Question: Just to follow up on Emily’s question, I think that there’s a difference between allowing city workers on their own personal time to march in a parade and having them show up in uniform with signs saying ‘City of New York Police Department.’ So if we have a little bit more about your thinking on that, and are you planning to attend the parade?

Mayor: I’ve said what I think. I respect the right of our City workers to march in uniform – period. And no, I am not planning on marching in the parade, I haven’t in the past in my capacity as an elected official. I will be participating in a number of other events to honor the Irish heritage of this city and the contributions of Irish Americans. But I simply disagree with the organizers of that parade in their exclusion of some individuals in this city. Thanks – OK, go ahead.

Why would Bill Bratton want his old job as head of the New York Police Department?

"Apart from being an optimist I guess I’m a glutton for punishment," Bill Bratton told reporters Wednesday evening after speaking at New York University.

Bratton was head of the NYPD under mayor Rudy Giuliani in his first term and left after a falling out with his boss. He went to lead the police department in Los Angeles and is now a consultant in the private sector. He advised a number of mayoral candidates including Democratic mayoral nominee Bill de Blasio, who leads his Republican rival by more than 40 points in recent public opinion polls.

Bratton said he has not spoken directly with de Blasio about the job and has not considered whether he is up for it.

"There was never a discussion about the commissioner’s position," he said.

Later, I asked Bratton whether he agrees wifh Giuliani about de Blasio having an “anti-police” agenda.

"I did not detect that at all in any of my conversation with him," Bratton said.

He acknowledged de Blasio expressed concerns about some NYPD practices (the use of stop-and-frisk was one major theme he highlighted during the campaign) but “I dont detect any of that as anti-police.” He added “I don’t detect any anti-police feelings or bias to my exposure to Mr. de Blasio.”

After the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the head of the NYPD’s Intelligence Unit, David Cohen, a former C.I.A. official, sought an expansion of those rules from a federal judge. In a letter to the court, Cohen was clear in the need to get rid of the requirement for “specific information.”

"The determination of whether or not there is specific information suggesting criminal activity may be a difficult one," he wrote. He added, "This criminal activity requirement as a threshold for investigative authority may effectively shield from discovery the lawful predatory activities which invariably precede terrorist attacks. In the case of terrorism, to wait for an indication of crime before investigating is to wait far too long."

Attacking NYPD’s Stop-and-Frisk

Briefing:

This afternoon, de Blasio will be on the City Hall steps with other lawmakers to announce a plan his office says will “dramatically reduce” the use stop-and-frisk.

De Blasio previewed his plan in an interview with the Times; it entails, among other things, a demand that the mayor “request an internal audit by the Police Department of its statistics on what occurs after each stop-and-frisk episode.”

An earlier attempt to curb the use of stop-and-frisks by NYPD officers actually wound up increasing use of the tactic. In a lengthy (and worth-reading, if you haven’t already) look at the NYPD, Chris Smith of New York magazine quoted an unnamed Brooklyn officer who said the paperwork already generated from stop-and-frisks “is an easy way for supervisors to feed the statistical best, to show that action is being taken to deal with spikes in crime.”

An oddity in polling questions a reader got from Quinnipiac last night:

According to the Council staffer, a Democrat, the pollster asked about the job performance of City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, Public Advocate Bill de Blasio and City Comptroller John Liu, but “did not mention [Scott] Stringer,” the Manhattan borough president.
"I did stay until the end. It just wasn’t one of the questions," said the Council staffer, who has no affiliation with Stringer and considered his exclusion "odd."

An oddity in polling questions a reader got from Quinnipiac last night:

According to the Council staffer, a Democrat, the pollster asked about the job performance of City Council Speaker Christine Quinn, Public Advocate Bill de Blasio and City Comptroller John Liu, but “did not mention [Scott] Stringer,” the Manhattan borough president.

"I did stay until the end. It just wasn’t one of the questions," said the Council staffer, who has no affiliation with Stringer and considered his exclusion "odd."

The Village Voice’s Powerless Politicians

villagevoicecover

The only thing I found interesting about the list — which isn’t at all serious or even logical —  is that it did not include embattled City Comptroller John Liu.

The list, written by Steven Thraser (#50), did include a number of politicos:

#8-Public Advocate Bill De Blasio

#16-Former public advocate Mark Green

#17-State Senator Ruben Diaz Sr.

#18-Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr.

#20-Former NYC Schools Chancellor Cathie Black

#21-Former NYC Schools Chancellor Joel Klein

#25-Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer

#54-Republican Rep. Michael Grimm

#55-Former NYC Comptroller Bill Thompson

#57-Empire State Pride Agenda

#59-Former Rep. Anthony Weiner

#60-Former governor Eliot Spitzer

#61-Former governor David Paterson

#64-Brooklyn Borough President Marty Markowitz

#66-Staten Island Tea Party leader Frank Santarpia

#83-Jimmy McMillan

#88-Anyone who voted for term limits

#93-Former NYC Transportation Commissioner Iris Weinshall

Public Advocate website hacked

Bill de Blasio emails:

Dear Friend,

We are contacting you because in the past you visited the New York City Public Advocate’s website and submitted information through one of our web forms, such as a “contact us” form or online petition. 

During the Christmas holiday weekend, the Public Advocate’s website was the target of a sophisticated cyber-attack.  Email correspondence and our internal contact management system were not accessed or exposed in any way. Information that website users submitted through forms on the website may have been accessed. Most of these submissions only include basic information such as a name and email address and no other personal information.

As a precautionary measure, we are asking that you notify us if you receive any suspicious communications such as SPAM or unsolicited emails asking for personal information with reference to the Public Advocate’s Office.

We take the security of your information as the highest priority, and our office employs a website management system and protocols that emphasize security and privacy protection.

We are currently working with various law enforcement agencies to further investigate the matter and we will assist the investigation any way we can. If you have any questions or concerns, you can click here for additional details or contact the office at 212-669-7250.

Thank you.

NYC Public Advocate’s Office